• markcoatney:

taylorlorenz:

New fave tumblr of the moment

I am going to follow the hell out of this. 

    markcoatney:

    taylorlorenz:

    New fave tumblr of the moment

    I am going to follow the hell out of this. 

  • “The splash screen elicited laughter all around. It’s such a bitmap paean to the tackiest and most self-parodying of baller “culture”; it might as well be an app Tom Haverford slapped together in Parks And Recreation. But it does, at a glance, sum up what Girls Around Me is all about: a radar overlaid on top of a Google Map, out of which throbs numerous holographic women posing like pole dancers in a perpetual state of undress.”

    Using a creepy app to teach people about protecting their privacy. 

  • “If someone posts a picture that seems to be evidence of a grisly murder to Facebook, don’t share it. Don’t even screencap it. If you lack the impulse control necessary not to screencap it, do not subsequently post the screencap (a) to your Facebook Wall; (b) to your Tumblr/blog/Twitter/YouTube/ChatRoulette; or (c) to your highly trafficked news site.”

    Michelle Dean on Things That Should Be Obvious: Don’t Publish Snuff Photos

  • Like, Sympathize, But Don’t Hate: How Social Media’s Enforced Positivity Is Making Us Dupes

A couple of years back, we ran a post called “The 10 Things That Are Killing Indie Music in 2011.” It discussed various ways in which the world of indie music could be better, and generated what amounted to a heap of attention for Flavorwire at the time, also stirring a healthy debate in the comments section (all of which sadly got nuked when we switched over to Facebook comments). Inter alia, several commenters took me to task for being “negative,” asking why I didn’t write something positive about the world of music instead of criticizing it. And, y’know, sure, why not? A couple of weeks later, I wrote “10 Things That We Love About Indie Music in 2011.” It generated precisely one-tenth of the traffic the first post did, proving neatly that for all people’s stated good intentions, negative pieces were a whole lot more popular on the Internet than positive ones. Or so it appeared, anyway.

But maybe not. The success of relentlessly positive sites like Upworthy has turned this paradigm on its head of late, leading to much chin-stroking and long, serious essays like Tom Scocca’s much-publicizedpiece for Gawker last week. Our own Michelle Dean has already written an erudite response to the whole smarm/snark debate, and I don’t want to go over old ground here, except to agree wholeheartedly with her contention that “positivity is just as much of a pose, a style, as negativity, and so just as much of a trap.”
This is true, except for one thing: positivity is increasingly enforced on us. This seems particularly relevant this week in light of the news that Facebook has apparently considered introducing a “Sympathize” button to go with its iconic “Like” button, so as to avoid those awkward instances when someone bitches about something in a status update and you’re not sure whether to Like it or not — you don’t want to imply you like the thing that’s upsetting the person in question, after all.
There are a couple of issues bound up in this. First, there’s the fact that it’s kinda hilarious that this has become such an issue that Facebook feels it might be necessary to provide a new button for people to express their emotions — and, similarly, the fact that users might also consider such a thing necessary when it takes two seconds to type “Shit, sorry your cat died” or whatever else is required instead of hitting Like.

READ MORE on Flavorwire

    Like, Sympathize, But Don’t Hate: How Social Media’s Enforced Positivity Is Making Us Dupes

    A couple of years back, we ran a post called “The 10 Things That Are Killing Indie Music in 2011.” It discussed various ways in which the world of indie music could be better, and generated what amounted to a heap of attention for Flavorwire at the time, also stirring a healthy debate in the comments section (all of which sadly got nuked when we switched over to Facebook comments). Inter alia, several commenters took me to task for being “negative,” asking why I didn’t write something positive about the world of music instead of criticizing it. And, y’know, sure, why not? A couple of weeks later, I wrote “10 Things That We Love About Indie Music in 2011.” It generated precisely one-tenth of the traffic the first post did, proving neatly that for all people’s stated good intentions, negative pieces were a whole lot more popular on the Internet than positive ones. Or so it appeared, anyway.

    But maybe not. The success of relentlessly positive sites like Upworthy has turned this paradigm on its head of late, leading to much chin-stroking and long, serious essays like Tom Scocca’s much-publicizedpiece for Gawker last week. Our own Michelle Dean has already written an erudite response to the whole smarm/snark debate, and I don’t want to go over old ground here, except to agree wholeheartedly with her contention that “positivity is just as much of a pose, a style, as negativity, and so just as much of a trap.”

    This is true, except for one thing: positivity is increasingly enforced on us. This seems particularly relevant this week in light of the news that Facebook has apparently considered introducing a “Sympathize” button to go with its iconic “Like” button, so as to avoid those awkward instances when someone bitches about something in a status update and you’re not sure whether to Like it or not — you don’t want to imply you like the thing that’s upsetting the person in question, after all.

    There are a couple of issues bound up in this. First, there’s the fact that it’s kinda hilarious that this has become such an issue that Facebook feels it might be necessary to provide a new button for people to express their emotions — and, similarly, the fact that users might also consider such a thing necessary when it takes two seconds to type “Shit, sorry your cat died” or whatever else is required instead of hitting Like.

    READ MORE on Flavorwire

  • 
In the end, Facebook became an extension of my high school life, one I just happen to be able to peek back into every once in a while. I actually appreciate having my messy teenage existence so readily available for my own perusal. I’m not the same person I was when I started using Facebook over seven years ago, but it’s nice to keep high school me around, acne and DIY bangs and all. I’ve come a long way.

Ten Years Later, Growing Up on Facebook Is Just Growing Up

    In the end, Facebook became an extension of my high school life, one I just happen to be able to peek back into every once in a while. I actually appreciate having my messy teenage existence so readily available for my own perusal. I’m not the same person I was when I started using Facebook over seven years ago, but it’s nice to keep high school me around, acne and DIY bangs and all. I’ve come a long way.

    Ten Years Later, Growing Up on Facebook Is Just Growing Up

  • The Knife hasn’t toured in the US since 2006 and we know you’re dying for one night of magic rush. So, we’re giving you the only web giveaway for tickets to their sold out NYC show, May 1. 

    Click here for more details on how to enter 

  • “There’s no reason why a bunch of assholes in San Francisco should be able to sit around in their well-stocked corporate canteen and enthuse about how cool it is that they can use all this data to change people’s moods, man, before they ride their Segways off into the sunset.”

    Tom Hawking, OKCupid Founder Says Experimenting on Users Is Just “How Websites Work” - But It Doesn’t Have to Be

We want to use this space to connect with you. Submit your news, videos, and photos to tips@flavorpill.com, and we might repost them here.