• 
It was bad enough that John Mayer shot his mouth off — and called his penis a “white supremacist” — in a Playboy interview. When he tried to apologize via Twitter, he made things even worse

Flavorwire’s list of the top 10 celebrity Twitter scandals. 

    It was bad enough that John Mayer shot his mouth off — and called his penis a “white supremacist” — in a Playboy interview. When he tried to apologize via Twitter, he made things even worse

    Flavorwire’s list of the top 10 celebrity Twitter scandals. 

  • ‘Scandal’ Season 3 Premiere Recap: “It’s Handled”

    "If you didn’t realize the Season 3 premiere would be just as insane as the episode that preceded it, then you haven’t been paying enough attention to Shonda Rhimes… What followed was so “twisty-turny” (as ABC itself has taken to describing Scandal in the promos) that I thought about writing this recap as a series of turn-by-turn driving directions.”

    READ MORE of the Season 3 Premiere recap on Flavorwire

  • ‘Scandal’ Season 3 Episode 2 Recap: “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”

    Taken together, Scandal‘s Season 2 finale and Season 3 premiere (both written by Shonda Rhimes) were two of the most action-packed hours in TV history. The fake-outs and hairpin turns just kept coming, to the delight of Twitter, but at the price of things like character development and exposition. Last night, thankfully, the show took some time to catch its breath, filling in the history of Olivia’s relationship with her father and reminding us of how little we actually know about the woman at the center of this show.

    Through a series of flashbacks set five years in the past, we learn that Olivia and Rowan were estranged, and that he lured her back into his life sometime after her mother’s death by offering to repay her law-school loans. Of course, there’s a catch: she has to meet him every Sunday night for dinner, where he wears a professorial sweater and regales her with some cozy lies about his bogus job at the Smithsonian.

    Although she’s icy at first, Olivia is just beginning to warm up to her dad when Huck — in his elaborately bearded Union Station hobo incarnation — saves her from being mugged on the subway platform. Witnessing how effectively her friendly neighborhood homeless guy takes out her attackers, she asks him where he learned to fight like that, and he mumbles something about being a government assassin in a secret program called “B613.”

    READ MORE of the 'Scandal' Season 3 Episode 2 Recap on Flavorwire

  • 'Scandal' Season 3 Episode 3 Recap: “Mrs. Smith Goes to Washington”
"There comes a time when every woman tasked with writing about Scandalmust break from the pack of breathless stans, and I’m sorry to say that for me, that time is now. For the first time in recent memory — perhaps the first time since Season 1, although probably not — I just couldn’t join Twitter in panting and squealing at the episode’s every minute plot twist. “Mrs. Smith Goes to Washington” brought plenty of action, but none of the pleasure that separates Scandal from increasingly dull political thrillers like Homeland.”
FULL RECAP on Flavorwire

    'Scandal' Season 3 Episode 3 Recap: “Mrs. Smith Goes to Washington”

    "There comes a time when every woman tasked with writing about Scandalmust break from the pack of breathless stans, and I’m sorry to say that for me, that time is now. For the first time in recent memory — perhaps the first time since Season 1, although probably not — I just couldn’t join Twitter in panting and squealing at the episode’s every minute plot twist. “Mrs. Smith Goes to Washington” brought plenty of action, but none of the pleasure that separates Scandal from increasingly dull political thrillers like Homeland.”

    FULL RECAP on Flavorwire

  • 'Scandal' Season 3 Episode 4 Recap: “Say Hello to My Little Friend”
"It’s Weiner time! Yes, as fans who paid attention to this week’s promos were anticipating, “Say Hello to My Little Friend” finds the Gladiators defending Richard Meyers, a married senator who’s been sending explicit text messages to a young woman named Desiree. Of course, since Scandal always has to up the ante, the man operating under the nom de sext Redwood Johnson isn’t just cheating on his wife; he’s on trial for Desiree’s murder.
Maybe it’s because of the ripped-from-the-headlines story or maybe I just like seeing Professor Lasky of Saved by the Bell: The College Yearsfame get work, but I was more drawn in to this week’s client story than the previous episode’s hostage situation. We got some pithy dialogue — “Slut-shame the dead girl? All aboard” — that also highlighted one of Shonda Rhimes’ favorite themes: the way women, and especially young women, can lose both their lives and their dignity as collateral damage of the Washington power structure.
FULL RECAP on Flavorwire

    'Scandal' Season 3 Episode 4 Recap: “Say Hello to My Little Friend”

    "It’s Weiner time! Yes, as fans who paid attention to this week’s promos were anticipating, “Say Hello to My Little Friend” finds the Gladiators defending Richard Meyers, a married senator who’s been sending explicit text messages to a young woman named Desiree. Of course, since Scandal always has to up the ante, the man operating under the nom de sext Redwood Johnson isn’t just cheating on his wife; he’s on trial for Desiree’s murder.

    Maybe it’s because of the ripped-from-the-headlines story or maybe I just like seeing Professor Lasky of Saved by the Bell: The College Yearsfame get work, but I was more drawn in to this week’s client story than the previous episode’s hostage situation. We got some pithy dialogue — “Slut-shame the dead girl? All aboard” — that also highlighted one of Shonda Rhimes’ favorite themes: the way women, and especially young women, can lose both their lives and their dignity as collateral damage of the Washington power structure.

    FULL RECAP on Flavorwire
  • "Well, I’m officially worried. Five episodes into Scandal Season 3, and the heady momentum of this fall’s premiere — and the wildly addictive, suspenseful season that preceded it — has entirely worn off. We’ve settled into that same “client of the week, plus a few minutes of progress on the season-long arc” pattern, and it’s all starting to feel a bit too easy and disposable, isn’t it? But wait: “More Cattle, Less Bull” is packed with reveals that have the potential to save this season, if the show just calms down on the twists for a minute and instead spends some time exploring their real impact on the characters.
This week’s client starts off more promising, and relevant to the show’s ongoing storyline, than usual: Josephine Marcus, the Democratic congresswoman played by the wonderful Lisa Kudrow, who appeared last week as Fitz’s biggest critic and got a big boost in both name recognition and sympathy after Mellie was caught on tape uttering some rather nasty words about her. Now, she’s running for president.”
Judy Berman, Scandal Season 3 Episode 5 Recap: “More Cattle, Less Bull”

    "Well, I’m officially worried. Five episodes into Scandal Season 3, and the heady momentum of this fall’s premiere — and the wildly addictive, suspenseful season that preceded it — has entirely worn off. We’ve settled into that same “client of the week, plus a few minutes of progress on the season-long arc” pattern, and it’s all starting to feel a bit too easy and disposable, isn’t it? But wait: “More Cattle, Less Bull” is packed with reveals that have the potential to save this season, if the show just calms down on the twists for a minute and instead spends some time exploring their real impact on the characters.

    This week’s client starts off more promising, and relevant to the show’s ongoing storyline, than usual: Josephine Marcus, the Democratic congresswoman played by the wonderful Lisa Kudrow, who appeared last week as Fitz’s biggest critic and got a big boost in both name recognition and sympathy after Mellie was caught on tape uttering some rather nasty words about her. Now, she’s running for president.”

    Judy Berman, Scandal Season 3 Episode 5 Recap: “More Cattle, Less Bull”

  • Could African Mythology Be the Answer to Black Female Stereotypes in The Media?
"The Huffington Post ran a piece, a few weeks ago, on a recent Essencesurvey that revealed that most of the magazine’s readers feel the portrayals of black women in the media are not fair representations of who they really are.
HuffPost summarizes the study as follows:

Essence surveyed 1,200 women about the images of black women in media and found that respondents felt the images were “overwhelmingly negative,” falling typically into categories including: “Gold Diggers, Modern Jezebels, Baby Mamas, Uneducated Sisters, Ratchet Women, Angry black Women, Mean black Girls, Unhealthy black Women, and black Barbies.”

Essence readers have a point. Only a handful of black women are playing roles in film and TV that are more complex than these stereotypes, which have been mainstays of how black women are portrayed in the media for the past hundred years: the mammy, the black bitch (also known as the angry black woman or originally “the Sapphire,” a term named for a character from the show Amos ‘n’ Andy), and the slut (historically referred to as the “Jezebel”). But a look at contemporary “Goddess consciousness” culture — a blend of many different indigenous cultures and New Age philosophy – reveals that these archetypes are actually resemble gross misinterpretations of some Goddesses (or “Orishas”) of Yoruba tradition: Yemaya, Oya, and Oshun.”
READ MORE on Flavorwire

    Could African Mythology Be the Answer to Black Female Stereotypes in The Media?

    "The Huffington Post ran a piece, a few weeks ago, on a recent Essencesurvey that revealed that most of the magazine’s readers feel the portrayals of black women in the media are not fair representations of who they really are.

    HuffPost summarizes the study as follows:

    Essence surveyed 1,200 women about the images of black women in media and found that respondents felt the images were “overwhelmingly negative,” falling typically into categories including: “Gold Diggers, Modern Jezebels, Baby Mamas, Uneducated Sisters, Ratchet Women, Angry black Women, Mean black Girls, Unhealthy black Women, and black Barbies.”

    Essence readers have a point. Only a handful of black women are playing roles in film and TV that are more complex than these stereotypes, which have been mainstays of how black women are portrayed in the media for the past hundred years: the mammy, the black bitch (also known as the angry black woman or originally “the Sapphire,” a term named for a character from the show Amos ‘n’ Andy), and the slut (historically referred to as the “Jezebel”). But a look at contemporary “Goddess consciousness” culture — a blend of many different indigenous cultures and New Age philosophy – reveals that these archetypes are actually resemble gross misinterpretations of some Goddesses (or “Orishas”) of Yoruba tradition: Yemaya, Oya, and Oshun.”

    READ MORE on Flavorwire

  • ‘Scandal’ Season 3 Episode 6 Recap: “Icarus”

    "Well, that’s more like it. After last week’s Scandal laid some intriguing groundwork while still failing to thrill me, I pretty much demanded that the show start heating up — and guess what? It did. “Icarus” opened with a flashback in which an adorably geeky 12-year-old Olivia Pope says good-bye to her mother (played by the wonderful Khandi Alexander, fromTreme) for what she doesn’t realize will be the last time.

    For the most part, this is an episode about the ongoing Operation Remington arc — but for the first time, the plot is all about the human drama, rather than Jake and Huck typing code and firing numbers at each other over the phone. (In fact, I can’t be the only one who’s just generally relieved that this week was light on Huck scenes.) They’ve shared their findings with Liv, and since she’s too afraid to confront her father about whether he’s behind her mother’s death, she stalks off to ask the president of the United States of America whether he performed a secret mission that involved shooting down that plane.

    Of course, the White House crew is shocked when it turns out Olivia isn’t there to accept their job offer. Once she has Fitz alone — a moment Mellie seems really perversely excited about — she goes hard on Remington, but he stonewalls her. “This is your boyfriend Jake talking,” he sniffs, insisting that Remington “does not exist” as far as she’s concerned. That’s when Liv tells him in no uncertain terms that she can’t be his campaign manager.

    Back at Pope HQ, it’s time to pretend that she’s picking Josie over Fitz for political reasons: first woman president! Wearing the white hat! Definitely nothing to do with the fact that the incumbent might have killed her mother 20 years ago! Well, whatever — I wanted to see Liv go head to head with Fitz in the political arena, and so far it’s everything I hoped it would be.

    And then it’s time for a major Josie Marcus overhaul. Her campaign needs money, and Liv convinces her to start courting big business for donations. It’s in these awkward meetings that Lisa Kudrow finally has room to do something interesting with the role. Here’s hoping she sticks around for much of the season.”

    READ MORE on Flavorwire

  • 
Stephen Colbert Tells the Definitive Rob Ford Joke
Just roll the phrase “Chris Farley tribute mayor” around in your head for a little bit, then cry that this dude is the elected leader of a major city once you pull yourself up off the floor.

This Week’s Top 5 TV Moments: Stephen Colbert on Crackgate 2013 on Flavorwire

    Stephen Colbert Tells the Definitive Rob Ford Joke

    Just roll the phrase “Chris Farley tribute mayor” around in your head for a little bit, then cry that this dude is the elected leader of a major city once you pull yourself up off the floor.

    This Week’s Top 5 TV Moments: Stephen Colbert on Crackgate 2013 on Flavorwire

  • LAST NIGHT’S ‘SCANDAL’ EPISODE!!!
READ THE RECAP on Flavorwire

    LAST NIGHT’S ‘SCANDAL’ EPISODE!!!

    READ THE RECAP on Flavorwire

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